Ski Legs

Hello Boca Skiers: It’s the time of year to start thinking about getting back into skiing shape. Now is a great time to start an exercise regimen that builds slowly and steadily avoiding training injuries. This will allow you to stay on the slopes all day long. Living in South Florida, at sea level, is a disadvantage as we travel to the mountains without much time to acclimate. So with a little prep and some common sense rules, we can all be ready to Ski and stay healthy!

Always consult your private medical doctor prior to beginning any exercise or nutrition regimen.

There are many ways to get used to the altitude so you can enjoy your skiing getaway. Here are some tips to get acclimated so you can focus on having fun!!

Oxygen
A quick way to adapt to the elevation is to carry a portable oxygen canister. Simply take a shot or two whenever you feel winded. Oxygen concentrators can be purchased or rented at most ski resorts. Also, the medical stations will have oxygen on-site for sick skiers.
Take it Easy
It’s understandable that you’re eager to hit the slopes, but take it slowly. Over-exertion will make it harder to adjust to the elevation. Try a low-impact activity on your first day such as snowmobiling. Many ski resorts offer alternatives to skiing and snowboarding; so you can still enjoy yourself while getting acclimated to the altitude. If you are flying into Denver, consider flying in a day early and staying in Denver for one night . Denver’s elevation is 5000ft. Sleeping overnight in Denver will help you to acclimate to 5000ft before you make the ascent to 9000ft. This two-step altitude adjustment gives your body more time to adjust.
Stay Hydrated
Drink plenty of liquids. High elevations can cause fluid loss, so it’s important to stay well hydrated. Stick with water or liquids that replace electrolytes. Avoid alcoholic, sugary and caffeinated beverages as these liquids act as diuretics and can dehydrate you. Drink lots of water! Frequent urinating from consuming so much water is much better than laying in bed with a splitting headache.
Eat Right
Stop in at Breckenridge’s world-class restaurants to recharge. A meal high in carbohydrates will improve your body’s ability to absorb oxygen, and will give you the energy needed to adjust to the elevation. Avoid salty foods – the sodium might increase your blood pressure, which can exacerbate the symptoms of altitude sickness. When we arrive in Summit County we like to eat at a place called “Noodles & Company”. They have delicious noodles that are high in carbs.
Take Your Vitamins and Medications
Always consult your physician before starting any new medication Some literature suggests that taking iron supplements can make it easier to perform aerobic activities (like skiing) at high elevations.Consult a doctor first, as iron is toxic in high doses. Taking 120 mg of Ginko Biloba in the weeks leading up to your skiing getaway, and maintaining that dosage during your trip, might also reduce the time needed to adjust to the altitude. Drugs such as Diamox (Acetazolamide) can reduce the symptoms and duration of altitude sickness. Ideally, Diamox should be taken a few days prior to your trip, but it can also be used on the spot if you start feeling ill. Keep ibuprofen or acetaminophen on hand to prevent headaches.
Descend to Sleep
Sleeping at a lower altitude makes it easier to adjust to the rarefied air of Breckenridge. You’ll feel better and have more energy after a good night’s sleep in a lodge at a lower elevation. Lodging is scattered all up and down the mountains, with some lodges being higher than 10,000 ft.
If All Else Fails
If you’ve feeling ill, descend to a lower elevation and work your way back up to the resort gradually. Sometimes the best remedy is simply time. While no one wants to lose out on a day’s fun, you’ll feel even worse if your whole trip is wrecked due to a prolonged illness. Always consult your private medical doctor prior to beginning any exercise or nutrition regimen.

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